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Donate Christmas greetings to Diabetes UK

Diabetes UK is asking people to wish their colleagues a Happy Christmas on a festive poster rather than sending cards within the workplace and donate the money saved from not buying cards, to the charity.

The charity has asked businesses across the Midlands to encourage their employees to sign up to the fundraising idea and support the UK's leading diabetes charity that cares for, connects with and campaigns on behalf of people affected by and at risk of diabetes.

Diabetes UK will supply the Christmas poster and an envelope for donations.

Joy Jones, Fundraising Manager for Diabetes UK in the Midlands, said: "This is a fun way to spread some Christmas cheer and to help us raise vital money. Instead of buying and then giving a card to the person at the desk next-door, our bright Christmas posters will still feel festive but donations will be well-spent on supporting our work."

There are over half a million people diagnosed with diabetes in the Midlands and the numbers are set to increase. Diabetes is the fastest growing health threat in the UK and by 2020 many areas will have over one in ten people living with the condition.

Diabetes is a condition where a person can't produce insulin, or doesn't produce enough. There are two main types of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2. About 10 per cent of people have Type 1. No one knows exactly what causes it, but it's not to do with being overweight and it isn't currently preventable.

Around 90 per cent of people have Type 2 diabetes. They might get Type 2 diabetes because of their family history, age and ethnic background which puts them at increased risk. People are more likely to get Type 2 diabetes if they are overweight.

Diabetes UK is working towards a future without diabetes. The charity helps people manage their diabetes effectively by providing information, advice and support. It campaigns to improve the quality of care across the UK's health services and fund pioneering research into care, cure and prevention of all types of diabetes.

If your workplace would like to take part, contact the fundraising team in the Midlands on 01922 614500 or email midlands@diabetes.org.uk.

Diabetes UK is the leading UK charity that cares for, connects with and campaigns on behalf of all people affected by and at risk of diabetes. For more information on all aspects of diabetes and access to Diabetes UK activities and services, visit www.diabetes.org.uk 

In the UK, there are around 3.8 million people who have diabetes. There are 3 million people living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and around 850,000 more who have Type 2 diabetes but don't know they have it because they haven't been diagnosed. As many as 7 million people are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and if current trends continue, an estimated 5 million people will have diabetes by 2025.
Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose in the blood because the body cannot use it properly. If not managed well, both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can lead to devastating complications. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age in the UK and is a major cause of lower limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke.
People with Type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin. About 10 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 1. No one knows exactly what causes it, but it's not to do with being overweight and it isn't currently preventable. It usually affects children or young adults, starting suddenly and getting worse quickly. Type 1 diabetes is treated by daily insulin doses - taken either by injections or via an insulin pump - a healthy diet and regular physical activity.
People with Type 2 diabetes don't produce enough insulin or the insulin they produce doesn't work properly (known as insulin resistance). 85 to 90 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 2. They might get Type 2 diabetes because of their family history, age and ethnic background puts them at increased risk. They are also more likely to get Type 2 diabetes if they are overweight. It starts gradually, usually later in life, and it can be years before they realise they have it. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a healthy diet and increased physical activity. In addition, tablets and/or insulin can be required.
For more information on reporting on diabetes, download our journalists' guide: www.diabetes.org.uk/journalists-guide

Source: Diabetes UK

 

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